Java

The Ship Show: I Don't Always Test, But When I Do...

Java Lobby Announcements - Sun, 2015-05-17 08:30
Do you test? Do you want to test? For many operations and build/release engineers (and even some developers!), testing can be a bit of a foreign concept. It’s hard to pay attention to getting to 100% code coverage on your unit tests for your infrastructure cookbooks and manifests when the infrastructure is on fire! But… maybe that’s why it’s on fire? For this episode, Mike McGarr walks us...
Categories: Java

R: Non-numeric Argument to Binary Operator

Java Lobby Announcements - Sun, 2015-05-17 08:30
When debugging R code, given my Java background, I often find myself trying to print out the state of variables along with an appropriate piece of text like this: names = c(1,2,3,4,5,6) > print("names: " + names) Error in "names: " + names : non-numeric argument to binary operator We might try this next: > print("names: ", names) [1] "names: " which doesn’t actually print the...
Categories: Java

Pedantic Arithmetic Rules

Java Lobby Announcements - Sun, 2015-05-17 08:30
Generations of math teachers have drilled into their students that they must reduce fractions. That serves some purpose in the early years, but somewhere along the way students need to learn reducing fractions is not only unnecessary, but can be bad for communication. For example, if the fraction 45/365 comes up in the discussion of something that happened 45 days in a year, the fraction 45/365...
Categories: Java

R: Replacing for Loops With Data Frames

Java Lobby Announcements - Sun, 2015-05-17 08:30
In my last blog post I showed how to derive posterior probabilities for the Think Bayes dice problem: Suppose I have a box of dice that contains a 4-sided die, a 6-sided die, an 8-sided die, a 12-sided die, and a 20-sided die. If you have ever played Dungeons & Dragons, you know what I am talking about. Suppose I select a die from the box at random, roll it, and get a 6.
What is the...
Categories: Java

NASA Open Up Their Data Vaults

Java Lobby Announcements - Sun, 2015-05-17 08:30
One of the more interesting trends of the last few years has been the opening up of vast swathes of data for innovators to start hacking away and trying to come up with creative solutions. The latest organization to go down this route is the US space agency NASA, who have opened a new open data portal. At the moment there are around 10,000 data sets available on the portal, each of which has...
Categories: Java

Python 101 for Aspiring Data Nerds

Java Lobby Announcements - Sun, 2015-05-17 08:30
Written by John Hammink for Treasure Data.As a data scientist, or anyone interested in collecting data for that matter, it’s no doubt helpful to know about how to go about collecting the data in your app – data that you’ll want to later query and analyze. Preview Text:  Here, we’ll build an app in Python from A-Z, iterate on it to make it...
Categories: Java

Catchpoint Alerting Now Integrated with OpsGenie

Java Lobby Announcements - Sun, 2015-05-17 08:30
[This article was written by Robert Castley]The very heart of the web performance monitoring industry to is help ensure quality of service of online systems. A vital part of achieving that goal is a robust alerting system that informs you of the widest possible variety of conditions, including: Preview Text:  The very heart of the web performance...
Categories: Java

The Key is Empowering the People Who Do the Work

Java Lobby Announcements - Sun, 2015-05-17 08:00
I was humbled and encouraged to learn that I was nominated for Nordic Startup Awards category of Developer Hero for my contributions to the developer community. You can vote for me or one of the other great candidates here. For the last ten years, I have felt that the main pain points of the software development world could be fixed by empowering and inspiring those who do the work. From my...
Categories: Java

API Tips -- How to Write API Documentation

Java Lobby Announcements - Sun, 2015-05-17 08:00
This article represents tips on how to write documentation for APIs which are going to be published to developers, both internal and external. It touches upon some of the important areas/points that needed to be included in API documentation such that developers find it easy enough to work with APIs. Please feel free to comment/suggest if I missed to mention one or more important...
Categories: Java

Virtusa to Present "Hadoop as a Service" at @CloudExpo New York | @VirtusaCorp [#BigData]

JDJ - Sun, 2015-05-17 07:30
Hadoop as a Service (as offered by handful of niche vendors now) is a cloud computing solution that makes medium and large-scale data processing accessible, easy, fast and inexpensive. In his session at Big Data Expo, Kumar Ramamurthy, Vice President and Chief Technologist, EIM & Big Data, at Virtusa, will discuss how this is achieved by eliminating the operational challenges of running Hadoop, so one can focus on business growth. The fragmented Hadoop distribution world and various PaaS solutions that provide a Hadoop flavor either make choices for customers very flexible in the name of options or restrictive in the name of abstraction provided.

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Categories: Java

Taking Back Cloud Control By @tShawnMills | @CloudExpo [#Cloud]

JDJ - Sat, 2015-05-16 19:00
With SaaS use rampant across organizations, how can IT departments track company data and maintain security? More and more departments are commissioning their own solutions and bypassing IT. A cloud environment is amorphous and powerful, allowing you to set up solutions for all of your user needs: document sharing and collaboration, mobile access, e-mail, even industry-specific applications. In his session at 16th Cloud Expo, Shawn Mills, President and a founder of Green House Data, will discuss how to get users to stay in compliance with corporate guidelines and actually use the tools provided for them rather than turning to outside, unsanctioned resources and potentially putting security at risk.

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Categories: Java

SmartBear Simplifies Continuous Delivery | @SmartBear @DevOpsSummit [#DevOps]

JDJ - Sat, 2015-05-16 19:00
SmartBear Software has released a TestComplete plugin for Jenkins, a popular open source continuous integration tool. The new TestComplete Jenkins plugin helps simplify and streamline continuous delivery process by making it easy for anyone to automatically execute and report on TestComplete tests through Jenkins. Customers deploying the new TestComplete Jenkins plugin are able to balance speed of application delivery with quality. While implementing continuous delivery, organizations often simplify the release process by prioritizing product backlog and releasing requirements in small increments frequently. This helps minimize cycle time between teams and accelerate application delivery schedules. Testing, many times, however can act as a bottleneck to such faster application delivery processes.

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Categories: Java

Cloud: Datacenters, Meet Software! By @IoT2040 | @CloudExpo [#Cloud]

JDJ - Sat, 2015-05-16 15:00
The PC revolution has redefined the notion of a computer over the past four decades. Now it might be time to redefine the notion of a collection of computers, that is, to redefine the notion of a datacenter. Datacenters are thought of as big places. Some of the more recent plants used by mega-users like Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and Facebook have acres of land under roof, with many tens of thousands of individual systems and power requirements that would support a small city. Even your friendly local, on-site enterprise datacenter is likely to be a big room with a big budget commitment and a lot of people hired to manage it. But what if a datacenter could fit in the corner of a room, or under a desk, or in the palm of your hand? This seems to be the direction we're headed, as data loads simultaneously grow exponentially and become ever more distributed. This is also part of the vision I saw and heard outlined at the recent Open Compute Summit in San Jose. Transparency as a Service The summit was sponsored by The Open Compute Project Foundation, with a goal “to design and enable the delivery of the most efficient server, storage and data center hardware designs for scalable computing,” according to its mission statement. Members strive to share ideas, specs, and intellectual property in an open environment. The foundation is keyed by Facebook and the company's commitment to transparency in how it builds out the massive datacenter infrastructure it requires. One significant announcement at the summit was made by Vapor.io and company CEO Cole Crawford. The company aims for nothing less than utter transformation of the datacenter, starting with a programmable, open-source based management solution at the top of the stack. Crawford and Chief Architect Steven White envision a modern, data-driven datacenter in which servers are “cattle, not pets,” following the still-new concept of software-defined servers and centers. “The Open Data Center Runtime Environment is the first accepted contribution to the Open Compute Foundation using the reciprocal license thus ensuring that forks and branches won’t exist,” according to Vapor.io. “We did this to ensure that when you are interacting with your data center, you’re communicating over a community owned, community standard.” The company's ultimate vision is a modern hardware configuration that brings new levels of efficiency and output to datacenters of all sizes. Mobility & Then the IoT The fast-growing global dataflow has mobility as today's primary driver. The proliferation of tablets and especially smartphones on a worldwide basis will cause the total amount of data being processed by the Internet to exceed a zettabyte (1 billion terabytes) annually this year or next. That's more than 30 terabytes per second. Smartphone ownership will reach into the billions soon enough, and even in many developing countries, such as the Philippines, there are now more mobile phones than people. But we ain't seen nuttin' yet—the Internet of Things (IoT) will be adding billions of new devices to the global Internet soon enough. Though much of the traffic it generates will be hyper-local (via Bluetooth and other short-range technologies), enough of it will be traveling along the Internet to increase global bandwidth to the dozens of zettabytes by the year 2020, according to Gartner and others. Think of it as cloud computing to the nth degree in all dimensions. Think of the phrase made famous by Sun Microsystems—“the network is the computer”--extending out to “the edge of the network is your computer.” The edge of the network seems to me to be much like the edge of the universe, that is, there is no such thing to the single observer. One person's edge is another's center. Cyberspace expands outward from wherever you are, and you will expect the same performance (some day) for your single device or your enterprise no matter where you are. Big, bulky, centralized data centers cannot provide this edge service ubiquitously and effectively. There is also the matter of energy consumption. Datacenters were using about 2% of all electricity consumption in the US in 2011—that number has certainly risen since then, although it did not rise as quickly as the EPA had originally estimated for the period 2007-11. Focus on Power Consumption But let's not get distracted by this particular metric. The big picture is one that features global power consumption and the aspiration of billions of people in developing nations to have better lives. As I've written about many times, and about which much of our research at the Tau Institute is focused, developing nations typically consume 3 to 5% of the electricity per-person of the developed world. We believe that an aggressive national commitment to IT is a primary indicator of sustained economic and societal growth. To achieve significant economic improvement therefore means we must achieve significant new efficiencies in power consumption. Right Direction The vision laid out by Vapor.io seems to be a positive step in this direction. Crawford says the technology, which already has its first customer in Indiana in the US, aims for a PUE of 1.1, compared to an industry average of 1.9 (PUE, or power usage effectiveness, is a simple measure of the ratio of total energy required by a datacenter divided by the amount used by the computing resources. The overhead is primarily eaten up by air-conditioning.) Crawford and team go further, asserting that a new metric needs to be put into place. The metric would be called performance per watt per dollar, or PWD. New efficiencies and new metrics are one big part of the puzzle. Another big part takes us back to the question near the beginning of this article. What if I could hold a datacenter in my hand? When will I be able to do this? For now, the direction is being set. The world will need more mega-datacenter technology in smaller urban spaces, as mobility and the IoT inexorably drive dataflows upward. It will also need as much cloud-driven technology within buildings and some day, per person, as we can imagine. The Software World The third big piece of the puzzle involves the software that's eating the world, in the phrase made notorious by Mark Andreessen in the Wall Street Journal in 2011. The world of cloud computing is a world of virtualization, containers, languages, platforms, architectures, and many things as-a-service. It is a world that is not familiar to many people in the world of datacenters. A grand conversation is beginning to take place, and will need to intensify dramatically to sync up where the world of data is going and where the world of datacenters should be going.

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Categories: Java

Can DevOps(Sec) Make Software More Secure?

Java Lobby Announcements - Sat, 2015-05-16 09:00
There was a lot of talk at RSA this year about DevOps and security: DevOpsSec or DevSecOps or Rugged DevOps or whatever people want to call it. This included a full-day seminar on DevOps before the conference opened and several talks and workshops throughout the conference which tried to make the case that DevOps isn’t just about delivering software faster, but making software better and more...
Categories: Java

Geek Reading May 14, 2015

Java Lobby Announcements - Sat, 2015-05-16 09:00
Today is security day. The Chromium blog starts our day by announcing the requirement of extensions being in the Chrome Store for all dev channels. This really limits the number of attack vectors people have with Chrome. Venture Beat reports on the VENOM vulnerability, which at least Amazon AWS states they are protected from. This is yet another vulnerability targeted at cloud servers. As...
Categories: Java

Fun with JavaScript on the JVM

Java Lobby Announcements - Sat, 2015-05-16 09:00
[This article was written by Chris Mowforth] Preview Text:  It’s easy to see how JavaScript is everywhere these days. The barrier to entry is extremely low; anybody with a browser can write and evaluate it, and with advancements in runtimes like Google’s V8, writing server-side JS is now a viable proposition. It’s easy to forget, then, that...
Categories: Java

SpringOne2GX 2014 Replay: Dive into Single-Page Application with RaveJS and Grails

Java Lobby Announcements - Sat, 2015-05-16 08:30
Recorded at SpringOne2GX 2014.Speaker: Fabrice MatratEssential Grails TrackSlides: http://www.slideshare.net/SpringCentral/dive-into-spa-with-grails-and-rave-js Preview Text:  See how this server-side guy fell in love with client-side application development when he discovered that his years of Grails experience already taught him how to be a...
Categories: Java

A Few Thoughts on Reactive Programming

Java Lobby Announcements - Sat, 2015-05-16 08:30
The word fashion is usually used, outside its own world, derogatorily. Hipsters have brought contempt for fashion to a new level. If you think about it, Hipsters, who, while claiming to hold fashion in contempt, have aroused the ire of people for whom the attack is not a defense of fashion, or mediocrity or popularity (the things Hipsters supposedly abhor), but rather a generalized aggression...
Categories: Java

The Origins of Trunk Based Development

Java Lobby Announcements - Sat, 2015-05-16 08:30
I’ve been trying to track down the pioneers of Trunk Based Development, and find out what their rationale and influences were. A big-ass trunk “General Sherman”, in California from wikipedia. Preview Text:  I’ve been trying to track down the pioneers of Trunk Based Development, and find out what their rationale and influences were. ...
Categories: Java

Deliberate Practice: Watching Yourself Fail

Java Lobby Announcements - Sat, 2015-05-16 08:30
I’ve recently been reading the literature written by K. Anders Eriksson and co on Deliberate Practice and one of the suggestions for increasing our competence at a skill is to put ourselves in a situation where we can fail. Preview Text:  I’ve recently been reading the literature written by K. Anders Eriksson and co on Deliberate Practice and...
Categories: Java

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